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©2018 BY LOW GRADE GLIOMA REGISTRY.

WELCOME TO THE INTERNATIONAL LOW GRADE GLIOMA REGISTRY

OVERVIEW OF OUR RESEARCH

One of the most critical questions in the field of neuro-oncology today is how to best manage and treat low-grade glioma (LGG), a malignant tumor of the brain. Dr. Elizabeth B. Claus, professor and director of Medical Research, Yale School of Public Health and attending neurosurgeon and director of Stereotactic Radiosurgery, Brigham and Women’s Hospital has focused her research and clinical practice on this malignant tumor.


In an effort to close this knowledge gap, the International Low-Grade Glioma Registry has been launched. The purpose of this registry is to discover why some people develop LGG while other people do not.  The goal is also to learn more about the effect of this diagnosis and the associated treatments on daily life including the ability to work, drive, sleep, exercise, or take care of oneself and/or family.

The study asks participants to 1) provide a pathology report, 2) complete an online questionnaire and 3) provide a saliva sample that will permit us to look at changes in DNA.

If you allow, we will also review your tissue specimens and MRI scans of your LGG. Some participants will be asked to contribute activity data and perform neurocognitive tasks via their smartphone. Click the sign-up button to access the questionnaire and consent form. You can learn more about our study by exploring the links below.

LEARN MORE ABOUT OUR STUDY

NATIONAL BRAIN TUMOR SOCIETY

INTERNATIONAL BRAIN TUMOR ALLIANCE

AMERICAN BRAIN TUMOR ASSOCIATION

National Cancer Institute

 

FAQ

What should I know and what do I need to do?

 

WHAT IS LOW GRADE GLIOMA?

A low grade glioma (LGG) is a slow growing tumor of the brain. 

  

WHAT IS THE GOAL OF THIS STUDY?

The purpose of this study is to discover why some people develop LGG while other people do not. We also hope to learn more about the effect of this diagnosis and the associated treatments on daily life including the ability to work, drive, sleep, exercise, or take care of oneself and/or family.

WHO IS ORGANIZING THIS STUDY?

The study is organized by Dr. Elizabeth B. Claus (Yale University School of Public Health and Brigham and Women’s Hospital Department of Neurosurgery)

WHO CAN ENTER THIS STUDY?

Any person over the age of 20 years with an initial diagnosis of LGG (astrocytoma, oligo-astrocytoma or mixed, oligodendroglioma)

WHAT ARE PARTICIPANTS ASKED TO DO?

The study asks participants to:

1) provide a pathology report and study consent form

2) complete an online questionnaire

3) provide a saliva sample that will permit us to look at changes in DNA.

If you allow, we will also review your tissue specimens and MRI scans of your LGG. Some participants will be asked to contribute activity data and perform neurocognitive tasks via their smartphone.


The consent form and questionnaire can be found here. Consent forms and pathology reports can be uploaded to the linked portal or emailed to glioma@yale.edu.

   

News

December 2018 Update

 
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